Intimate Justice – Hardcover – Shatema Threadcraft

Intimate Justice The Black Female Body and the Body Politic Shatema Threadcraft Reviews and Awards

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Intimate Justice

The Black Female Body and the Body Politic

Shatema Threadcraft

Reviews and Awards

Sara A. Whaley Book Prize, National Women’s Studies Association
W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award, National Conference of Black Political Scientists
Race and Political Theory Best Book Award, American Political Science Association

“With theoretical sophistication and admirable moral clarity, Intimate Justice reframes what corrective racial justice should entail by taking the deprivation of black women’s intimate capacities as its starting point. Threadcraft makes a compelling case that the debate about racial justice has focused almost exclusively on the civic harms suffered by blacks in the public sphere, thereby overlooking the thwarting of black women’s intimate capacities in the private sphere. She brilliantly spells out what a fuller account of racial justice would entail.” –Juliet Hooker, Associate Professor of Government and African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas at Austin

“‘Establishing meaningful intimate justice is every bit as important as economic and political justice.’ Shatema Threadcraft’s Intimate Justice powerfully demonstrates the wisdom of that claim and the urgency of developing a theory of freedom that locates the historical and contemporary experiences of African American women and girls at its center. This is a foundational text for all political theorists.” –Lawrie Balfour, author of Democracy’s Reconstruction: Thinking Politically with W.E.B. Du Bois

“Threadcraft’s Intimate Justice is remarkably confident, sophisticated, and engrossing. This fresh, ambitious work successfully brings feminist political theory together with Black feminist thought, richly exploring ways to think about and achieve justice within the sphere of intimate relations.” –Rickie Solinger, author of Reproductive Justice: What Everyone Needs to Know

“As a result of the legacy of the violation of Black women, Threadcraft suggests the creation of local, Black-female led offices that act as service centers for victims and also provide cultural and representational support for Black women. Such spaces could help change the meaning of Black womanhood by uplifting the art and creative contributions of Black women, allowing them to define themselves.” – Melissa Brown, University of Maryland

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