Technology & Marketing Law Blog –

Technology & Marketing Law Blog –

The plaintiffs want to create fake job profiles to research algorithmic discrimination. Fearing that their research activities would expose them to criminal CFAA prosecution, they challenged the CFAA as violating their First Amendment rights. Venkat blogged a preliminary ruling in…

U.S. Supreme Court Confirms that States Have Sovereign Immunity from Copyright Infringement Suits--Allen v. Cooper

by guest blogger Tyler Ochoa On March 23, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held in Allen v. Cooper,  No. 18-877, that states have sovereign immunity from claims of copyright infringement, and that 17 U.S.C. § 511, which purports to waive…

Judge Isn't Impressed By Lawyer's Purported Unfamiliarity With LinkedIn--Reyes v. Tanaka

Juror #1 was empaneled on a trial. Myles Breiner is one of the plaintiff’s lawyers. On the 6th day of trial, Breiner sent Juror #1 an invitation to connect on LinkedIn. Out-of-court interactions between jurors and the litigating lawyers is…

Humvee Can't Stop Depictions of Its Vehicles in the 'Call of Duty' Videogame--AM General v. Activision Blizzard

It has unexpectedly turned into Videogame Law week here at the Technology & Marketing Law blog. This is my third videogame IP blog post this week. See my prior posts on tattoo copyrights and signature moves. All three rulings are…

Ninth Circuit Rallies in Defense of a Parody Dog Toy--Bad Spaniels v. Jack Daniel's

So we are back to litigation over dog chew toys. The case involves the “Bad Spaniels” dog toy, part of a “Silly Squeakers” line from the smartly-branded enterprise “VIP Products.” The dog toy intentionally riffs on the Jack Daniel’s brand…

Videogame Can Replicate Musician's "Signature Move" (Unless It's a False Endorsement, Which It Isn't)--Pellegrino v. Epic Games

Pellegrino is a saxophone player with “externally rotatable feet,” which has helped him develop a nifty “signature” dance move while playing. The videogame Fortnite sells “emotes,” optional customizations for players’ digital avatars. Pellegrino alleges that the “Phone It In” emote…

Videogame Doesn't Infringe Tattoo Copyright By Depicting Basketball Players--Solid Oak Sketches v. 2K Games

This case deals with a venerable and vexing copyright law problem: if a person doesn’t own the copyright to his/her tattoos, do other people infringe by accurately depicting the person? The answer surely has to be “no.” Otherwise, ordinary daily…

Section 230 Protects Classifying Non-Competitive Software as a Threat--Asurvio v. Malwarebytes

Section 230(c)(2)(B) says that filtering software makers aren’t liable for their classification decisions. This proposition provides the legal foundation for the anti-threat software industry. However, those expectations were disrupted by the Ninth Circuit’s 2019 in Enigma v. Malwarebytes, which held…

Redbox's Terms of Use Fail (OUCH)--Wilson v. Redbox

Redbox allegedly sent unwanted texts to Wilson. Wilson sued for TCPA violations. Redbox invoked the arbitration clause in its TOU. The court says the TOU did not properly form and denies the arbitration request. Ouch. Wilson joined Redbox in 2007…

"Material Support for Terrorism" Lawsuit Fails a Third Time--Colon v. Twitter

This lawsuit alleges that social media providers contributed to the 2016 Pulse Nightclub terrorist attack in Orlando that killed 49 people and injured dozens more. If that sounds familiar, that’s because those facts formed the basis of the Crosby v….

Source Article

Comments are closed.