Tag: Politics

Television and Politics – Google Books

“The authorshave analyzed the television problem brilliantly. They had come up with a whole set of new insights, and their backup research always is fascinating to read.”-Saturday Review

“A cautious, research-based bookhopefully it will set a trend.”-Ithiel de Sola Pool, Public Opinion Quarterly

After more than forty years of studying its political implications, Kurt and Gladys Lang put the power of television into a unique perspective. Through carefully compiled case studies, they reveal surprising truths about TV’s effect on American political life, and explode some popular myths. Their theme throughout is that television gives the viewer the illusion of being a favored spectator at some event-he “sees for himself,” in other words. But, in fact, it conveys a reality different from that experienced by an eyewitness. Because the televised version of an event reaches more people, it has greater impact on the public memory and comes to overshadow what

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Politics at Reading | News, events and thoughts from Politics and International Relations at Reading

The 56th United Nations Graduate Study Programme, at UN Headquarters in Geneva. From more than 1000 applications from several universities in 193 countries, 52 participants from 45 countries were selected to attend the Programme in July 2018. One of these was University of Reading MA International Security Studies student Mustafa Aryan.

For two weeks, Mustafa studied with amazing people from organisations around the world and he has shared his report with us. Continue reading

How research can support and strengthen the United Nations

Please join us for a one-day conference, and launch of the UN and Global
Order Programme at the University of Reading

KEYNOTE SPEECHES
IAN MARTIN
Former Special Representative of the
Secretary General in Libya, Nepal, and Timor-Leste
DOMINIK ZAUM
Research Dean for Prosperity and Resilience

THURSDAY 26 APRIL
9:15 – 4:30

REGISTRATION BEGINS AT 8:45AM

UNIVERSITY OF READING, LONDON ROAD CAMPUS
LO22 G01

ADMISSION FREE, BOOKING

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Opinion | China’s Power Politics

While Mr. Zhou is Mr. Xi’s biggest and most recent target, just a month earlier, on June 30, Gen. Xu Caihou, formerly the most powerful figure in the People’s Liberation Army, was handed over to prosecutors to face charges of corruption. Only now, with both men officially destroyed, can Mr. Xi safely say that he is in control of a system where power still flows from the barrel of a gun.

General Xu will probably be courtmartialed for bribes allegedly received in exchange for promotions, and Mr. Zhou will be tried in connection with the massive empire that his relatives built on the back of inside oil deals. But behind closed doors, they may also be accused of political transgressions like conspiring to protect the first Politburo “tiger” who was in Mr. Xi’s sites: the former Chongqing party boss Bo Xilai, whose rising political power was seen as a threat

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War | Politics and War Wiki

War is a game mechanic in which two nations’ militaries are pitted against each other. As nation leader, you have control over your nation’s military, and must decide what units to build, what battles to execute, and what your overall war strategy is. This manual covers the details of how war mechanics work, and provides insights into the different units, battles, and facets of war.

Resistance and Military Action PointsEdit

Wars are based on a system called Resistance. Each side starts the war with 100 resistance and resistance is reduced through every attack or increased through a specific action. The nation that reduces the opponent’s resistance to zero wins the war and the nation that loses gets “beiged”.To

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Politics & Public Administration – Politics & Public Administration

Welcome to the Department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University!  I am delighted you are interested in the Department, our programs, students, faculty and activities.  I am very fortunate to be the Chair of the Department – a position which is centrally about facilitating student, faculty and program success. I am excited about our past successes and our future contributions to understanding the relationship between local through to global events and phenomena, and the way that formal and informal political power and authority shapes human well-being. Most importantly, we aim to help students develop into critically informed citizens and to advance research that advances knowledge about social and political challenges of the past, present and future.

The Department of Politics and Public Administration has a long and distinguished history of teaching.  While Ryerson was established as a degree granting university in 1994, our Department has been teaching undergraduate

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7 Powerful Habits To Win In Office Politics

Office politics – a taboo word for some people. It’s a pervasive thing at the workplace.

In its simplest form, workplace politics is simply about the differences between people at work; differences in opinions, conflicts of interests are often manifested as office politics. It all goes down to human communications and relationships.

There is no need to be afraid of office politics. Top performers are those who have mastered the art of winning in office politics. Below are 7 good habits to help you win at the workplace:

1. Be Aware You Have a Choice

The most common reactions to politics at work are either fight or flight. It’s normal human reaction for survival in the wild, back in the prehistoric days when we were still hunter-gatherers.

Sure, the office is a modern jungle, but it takes more than just instinctive reactions to win in office politics. Instinctive fight reactions

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Australian Politics

Articles

The fun-police state

March 30 2020

I am becoming increasingly concerned that this nation is losing its perspective in the face of the Coronavirus. The PM has unleashed an army of jealous wowsers, curtain twitchers and hall monitors to dictate how their neighbours live. We are banned from heading out and being seen to have fun or do something frivolous. Yet we are literally forced to go out and engage in high risk activities so long as it is our least favourite thing to do.

What does this say about our values?

Discuss

I can understand people’s fear of Australia turning into another Italy. And just to be clear, I think we should keep the ban on men hugging men when this is all over (unless they plan to have sex, because there is nothing wrong with that…) Also, wildly gesticulating while you are talking on your mobile

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Pluralism | politics | Britannica

Pluralism, in political science, the view that in liberal democracies power is (or should be) dispersed among a variety of economic and ideological pressure groups and is not (or should not be) held by a single elite or group of elites. Pluralism assumes that diversity is beneficial to society and that autonomy should be enjoyed by disparate functional or cultural groups within a society, including religious groups, trade unions, professional organizations, and ethnic minorities.

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interest group: Pluralism

Pluralism and neo-corporatism are the two primary theories that have been put forward to explain interest group influence…

Pluralism was stressed most vigorously in England during the early 20th century by a group of writers that included Frederic Maitland, Samuel G. Hobson, Harold Laski, Richard H. Tawney, and George Douglas Howard Cole, who reacted against what they alleged to be the alienation of the individual under conditions

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The genetics of politics – Body politic | Science and technology

IN 1882 W.S. Gilbert wrote, to a tune by Sir Arthur Sullivan, a ditty that went “I often think it’s comical how Nature always does contrive/that every boy and every gal that’s born into the world alive/is either a little Liberal or else a little Conservative.”

In the 19th century, that view, though humorously intended, would not have been out of place among respectable thinkers. The detail of a man’s opinion might be changed by circumstances. But the idea that much of his character was ingrained at birth held no terrors. It is not, however, a view that cut much ice in 20th-century social-scientific thinking, particularly after the second world war. Those who allowed that it might have some value were generally shouted down and sometimes abused, along with all others vehemently suspected of the heresy of believing that genetic differences between individuals could have a role

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Politics and Lies – Why Politicians Lie








Politicians lie because the public wants to be lied to



The reasons politicians lie is because the public doesn’t want to hear
the truth. People want to hear what they want to hear. When two
candidates are running and one of the tells the truth and the other says
what the public wants to hear, the one who says what the public wants to
hear wins the election. Thus, and there are exceptions to this, if you
want to win an election, you better start lying, because the guy who’s
telling you the truth doesn’t have a chance.



The 1988 presidential election is an example of this. You will recall
the famous lie, “Reeeaaad myyy llliiipsss, nnoooo neeewww taaaxxxeeesss”
was the famous lie that Bush told over and over again. Maybe Bush could
say that the public misunderstood him

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